Saturday, May 14, 2011

Tick season, Lyme's Disease, and Homeopathics

     I have seen a flurry of emails on my lists about people finding multiple ticks on their kids after playing outside.  It reminded me to begin to keep a look out for new "moles" with legs.
    I know many people know the symptoms of Lyme's disease but just in case you don't here is a brief list of what to look for:

  • Bull's eye rash
  • Flu like symptoms - fatigue, achy muscles or joints, fever, chills, stiff neck, swollen glands, headache.
  • Nondescript symptoms - headache, weakness, tingling, numbness, lack of energy, moodiness, achy. 
     Now something I didn't know about Lyme's Disease....teasel root.  Teasel root (xu duan) is a flowering plant.  It can be used internally or externally.  In Chinese Medicine, it affiliated with the liver and kidney.  It functions to tonify the liver and kidneys, promote blood circulation, and strengthen bones and tendons.  It also helps to treat pains and weakness in the lower back, to help repair tissue damage in such areas of the bones and ligaments, and control bleeding during a woman's pregnancy.  It is also homeopathic used to help with treating Lyme's disease.  There are loads of articles and videos out there on the internet about Lyme's disease and teasel root.  It is something to seriously consider.  Here is some of the interesting things that I found:


How much teasel root should I take?
The amount of teasel root being used depends on the condition(s) being treated. Generally, most practitioners recommend between 6 and 21 grams of teasel root per day. Some herbalists recommend a slightly higher minimum dose (10 grams per day). ---from Nutritional wellness
http://www.ladybarbara.net/html/using_teasel.html - talks about teasel root, where to get it, and dosing.  She also offers classes in using herbal remedies.  I thought she was interesting.

The Book of Herbal Wisdom: Using Plants as Medicines  recommended by many, and received 5 stars by those reviewed on Amazon.  It has a chapter dedicated to teasel root. 

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